Just like how Housing Development Board’s (HDB) flats get repainted every seven years, we’re pretty sure that the interior of our homes could use some sprucing up over a period of time too. With an increase in the number of young homeowners, it also sees more choosing to design their homes looking minimalistic. Apart from the choice of furniture, it also reflects upon its wall decorations too.

Thus, below, we compare wallpapers versus painting of your walls at home. By weighing its pros and cons based on cost, durability, preparation time as well selection range below, we hope it aids in your decision making — be it for your new home or to freshen up your current abode.

 

Cost

Image: Wallhub

With the economy’s uncertainty, we’re pretty sure many homeowners would opt for the cheaper option. Of course, either way, you could source out for the supplies and do it yourself (D.I.Y) to save on the total cost. Otherwise, if you choose to hire professionals to get the job done, below’s an estimated price breakdown following the size of a four-room flat.

*Price may vary depending on the type of material or colour selection made.

Wallpaper

Pros:

  • Similar to paint, with more rolls purchased, most stores offer bundle prices.
  • If you have done exact measurements of your space, you wouldn’t have any wasted rolls thus, saving your overall cost.

Cons:

  • For more intricate designs, they are relatively expensive.
  • As some wallpapers are exclusive that would require ordering from overseas, you’d need to include shipping costs as well.

Estimated cost:

  • Standard 15 m (length) x 1m roll: between $40 to $300
  • Living room (four to five rolls): $80 to $1500
  • Cost of wallpaper with pasting services: Additional $150 to $500

Paint

Pros:

  • With more paint purchased, there usually is a bundle price.
  • Unlike wallpaper that is priced per metre, paint has a fixed price according to the number of tins purchased.

Cons:

  • If you do not already have the materials required for painting, extra costs will need to be incurred on top of the price of the paint.
  • Depending on your wall condition, you might need to include purchasing a primer to coat cracked walls.

Estimated cost:

  • Three bedrooms: 15L
  • Living room and corridor or balcony: 15L
  • Ceilings: 15L

 

Durability

Image: @wallhubsg

One must consider the durability of both options before coming to a decision. Try putting yourself in situations that may occur at home. Perhaps how frustrating it can get to wipe crayon marks off the wall or that your pets could start scratching off the wallpapers.  Let’s weigh the pros and cons of each below.

Wallpaper

Pros:

  • Lasts up to 15 years if cared for frequently.
  • Most wallpapers can be wiped down if stained.

Cons:

  • Wallpapers installed in damp areas (bathroom, kitchen) might require frequent re-attaching, especially on the edges.
  • If you are using a couple of rolls of patterned wallpaper, you’ll need to ensure it’s all aligned and matched.

Paint

Pros:

  • Easy to touch up patches with a fresh coat of paint.
  • Comes in a large selection suited for each room, including kitchen and bathroom.

Cons:

  • Paint can only last up to five years — will discolour over time.
  • You might not be able to get the same shade of paint when you need to repaint.

 

Preparation time

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We get how busy work could get, especially in this mid-year season. Now that you’re only left with the weekends, you’d likely want to opt for an option that is easy and fast to prepare. In other words, the less time-consuming one. The estimated time below is based on a wall that has existing wallpaper or coloured paint.

Wallpaper

Pros:

  • You’ll just need to paste the roll of wallpaper on the wall and you’re good to go.
  • Less mess made — there isn’t a need to cover the floors with plastic beforehand.

Cons:

  • You’d need to knit pick each and every ‘bubble’ you spot by removing and repasting the wallpaper umpteenth times.
  • A new layer of wallpaper cannot be applied on top of the existing one so stripping the old one is another challenge on its own.

Paint

Pros:

  • If you have all materials prepared, it’s merely painting from top to bottom and you’re done.
  • Unlike wallpaper that requires knick-picking to prevent bubbles, any patchy spots can just be painted over.

Cons:

  • Will be required to fill in the holes and cracks in the wall for a smoother paint coating.
  • If your current wall is of a dark colour and you’re looking to change it to a lighter shade, you may also be required to paint the wall with a white base (double coated) before proceeding to paint.
  • Takes time to cover up furniture and flooring so the paint doesn’t drip over.

 

 

Selection range

Image: @nipponpaintsg

We get how you may want to follow the theme of the room or perhaps to match some of your furniture. When it comes to picking out the colours or design for the wall, of course, it’d be best that you are given a range of selections to choose from.

*If you’re an indecisive person, here’s a job for your partners instead.

Wallpaper

Pros:

  • Large selection of designs that could easily match with home furniture or room designs.
  • A good alternative to painting as plain designs are available as well.

Cons:

  • Not all materials are suited for all rooms.
  • If you end up changing up your home fixtures, wallpapers may go out of trend.

Types of wallpaper

  • Liner: Made from paper, hides wall defects well. Relatively thin thus best used as a base for a delicate wallpaper instead.
  • Printed: Like its name states, best used as wall decor for a baby’s nursery, living room feature wall
  • Vinyl: Composed printed paper coated with vinyl. Thicker than other types of wallpaper, can be used for kitchen and bathroom.
  • Flock: Fuzzy three-dimensional patterns, most expensive especially since it reflects a sense of luxury
  • Mylar: Printed paper on polyester film. Can be easily wiped or washed and most recommended for kitchens and bathroom
  • Bamboo: Environmentalists here’s one just for you that’s handcrafted from natural bamboo.

Paint

Pros:

  • With options such as ‘odour less’ paint, gone are the days when you’ll have to wait for days before falling back into your normal routine.
  • Comes in different consistencies, suited for different rooms.

 

Cons

  • Unless you are a little crafty by creating your own designs, paint is relatively plain coloured which could make the room a little bare.
  • Paint colour range changes over time with newer inventions, thus it may be hard to find a similar shade the next time around.

Types of paint:

  • Matte: Provides the most coverage but least durable; works best for low traffic areas such as ceilings
  • Eggshell: Covers wall defects and more durable than matte paint. Suited for hallways and entryways.
  • Satin: Most commonly used interior paint. Easy to clean thus suited for kitchens, bathrooms, playrooms.
  • Semi-gloss: Shiny and reflective, extremely durable thus best used for rooms that get a lot of wear and tear.
  • High-gloss: Shiniest of all, suited for cabinets and shutters.

Amidst all that, there are also options for odourless paints especially if you aren’t fans of the smell post-painting. Recently, there is even a paint said to counter the coronavirus.

 

With all the pros and cons weighed between painting or pasting wallpaper on your walls, we hope it has aided in your decision-making to spruce up your abode. One thing’s for sure, either way, do it well so you won’t end up stressing over it within the next year or so.

Feature image: @wallhubsg